Chemical elements
  Selenium
    Isotopes
    Energy
    Production
    Application
    Allotropy
    Colloidal
    Physical Properties
    Chemical Properties
      Hydrogen Selenide
      Selenium Fluorides
      Selenium Monochloride
      Selenium Tetrachloride
      Selenium Monobromide
      Selenium Tetrabromide
      Selenium Chlorobromides
      Selenium Oxyfluoride
      Selenium Oxychloride
      Sulphur Selenium Oxytetrachloride
      Selenium Oxybromide
      Chloroselenic Acid
      Selenium Dioxide
      Selenious Acid
      Selenium Trioxide
      Selenic Acid
      Selenates
      Perselenic Acid
      Selenium Sulphoxide
      Selenotrithionic Acid
      Diselenotrithionic Acid
      Selenopentathionic Acid
      Selenium Nitride
      Nitrosylselenic Acid
      Phosphorus Subselenide
      Phosphorus Monoselenide
      Tetraphosphorus Triselenide
      Phosphorus Triselenide
      Phosphorus Pentaselenide
      Phosphorus Chloroselenide
      Selenophosphates and Oxyselenophosphates
      Carbon Diselenide
      Carbon Subselenides
      Carbon Oxyselenide
      Carbon Sulphidoselenide
      Cyanogen Monoselenide
      Cyanogen Diselenide or Selenocyanogen
      Cyanogen Triselenide
      Selenocyanic Acid
      Ammonium Selenocyanate
      Caesium Triselenocyanate
      Copper Selenocyanate
      Lead Selenocyanate
      Magnesium Selenocyanate
      Mercurous Selenocyanate
      Mercuric Selenocyanate
      Potassium Selenocyanate
      Silver Selenocyanate
      Sodium Selenocyanate
      Zinc Selenocyanate
      Silicon Selenide
    Detection and Estimation

Sulphur Selenium Oxytetrachloride, SeSO3Cl4






Sulphur Selenium Oxytetrachloride, SeSO3Cl4 or SeCl4.SO3, can be produced by the direct combination of sulphur trioxide and selenium tetrachloride. It has also been obtained by heating selenium tetrachloride with chlorosulphonic acid, sulphuric acid, pyro-sulphuric acid or sulphuryl chloride,

SeCl4 + Cl.SO2OH = SeCl4.SO3 + HCl,

also by the action of pyrosulphuryl chloride on selenium, and by heating a mixture of sulphuryl and selenyl chlorides at 170° to 180° C. in a sealed tube:

SO2Cl2 + SeOCl2 = SeSO3Cl4.

The product of these reactions is a fairly stable colourless crystalline solid which melts at 165° C. and boils at 185° C. When vaporised it is largely dissociated, the vapour density at 210° C. being approximately one-third of the theoretical.

Water decomposes the substance with the formation of selenious, sulphuric and hydrochloric acids.

The constitution of the substance has been represented by the formula



but Prandtl and Borinski consider that it is better represented as a simple additive compound, SeCl4.SO3.


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