Chemical elements
  Selenium
    Isotopes
    Energy
    Production
    Application
    Allotropy
    Colloidal
    Physical Properties
    Chemical Properties
      Hydrogen Selenide
      Selenium Fluorides
      Selenium Monochloride
      Selenium Tetrachloride
      Selenium Monobromide
      Selenium Tetrabromide
      Selenium Chlorobromides
      Selenium Oxyfluoride
      Selenium Oxychloride
      Sulphur Selenium Oxytetrachloride
      Selenium Oxybromide
      Chloroselenic Acid
      Selenium Dioxide
      Selenious Acid
      Selenium Trioxide
      Selenic Acid
      Selenates
      Perselenic Acid
      Selenium Sulphoxide
      Selenotrithionic Acid
      Diselenotrithionic Acid
      Selenopentathionic Acid
      Selenium Nitride
      Nitrosylselenic Acid
      Phosphorus Subselenide
      Phosphorus Monoselenide
      Tetraphosphorus Triselenide
      Phosphorus Triselenide
      Phosphorus Pentaselenide
      Phosphorus Chloroselenide
      Selenophosphates and Oxyselenophosphates
      Carbon Diselenide
      Carbon Subselenides
      Carbon Oxyselenide
      Carbon Sulphidoselenide
      Cyanogen Monoselenide
      Cyanogen Diselenide or Selenocyanogen
      Cyanogen Triselenide
      Selenocyanic Acid
      Ammonium Selenocyanate
      Caesium Triselenocyanate
      Copper Selenocyanate
      Lead Selenocyanate
      Magnesium Selenocyanate
      Mercurous Selenocyanate
      Mercuric Selenocyanate
      Potassium Selenocyanate
      Silver Selenocyanate
      Sodium Selenocyanate
      Zinc Selenocyanate
      Silicon Selenide
    Detection and Estimation

Selenium Monobromide, Se2Br2






Selenium Monobromide, Se2Br2, is produced together with the tetrabromide by the action of boiling bromine on selenium. The reaction, which is accompanied by considerable heat evolution, may be moderated by dissolving the bromine in carbon disulphide. The substance can also be produced by treating the tetrabromide with selenium at the ordinary temperature.

It is a very deep red liquid having a density of 3.60 at 15° C.; its odour is unpleasant. It is soluble in carbon disulphide and in chloroform and is, in its turn, a solvent for selenium. When heated, partial decomposition occurs, with formation of bromine and the tetrabromide, distillation taking place at 225° C.

The action of water on selenium monobromide is analogous to the action on the corresponding chlorine compound, selenium and selenium dioxide being formed.

Combination with bromine readily occurs, with production of the tetrabromide.

Selenium monobromide reacts with gaseous ammonia in a similar way to the corresponding chloride. With liquid ammonia in the presence of ether, it gives the compound Se2N2Br.

From the fact that on reacting with organo-magnesium compounds selenium monobromide gives rise to organic substances containing a chain linking, -Se-Se- , it is probable that the constitution is to be represented by Br-Se-Se-Br.


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