Chemical elements
  Selenium
    Isotopes
    Energy
    Production
    Application
    Allotropy
    Colloidal
    Physical Properties
    Chemical Properties
      Hydrogen Selenide
      Selenium Fluorides
      Selenium Monochloride
      Selenium Tetrachloride
      Selenium Monobromide
      Selenium Tetrabromide
      Selenium Chlorobromides
      Selenium Oxyfluoride
      Selenium Oxychloride
      Sulphur Selenium Oxytetrachloride
      Selenium Oxybromide
      Chloroselenic Acid
      Selenium Dioxide
      Selenious Acid
      Selenium Trioxide
      Selenic Acid
      Selenates
      Perselenic Acid
      Selenium Sulphoxide
      Selenotrithionic Acid
      Diselenotrithionic Acid
      Selenopentathionic Acid
      Selenium Nitride
      Nitrosylselenic Acid
      Phosphorus Subselenide
      Phosphorus Monoselenide
      Tetraphosphorus Triselenide
      Phosphorus Triselenide
      Phosphorus Pentaselenide
      Phosphorus Chloroselenide
      Selenophosphates and Oxyselenophosphates
      Carbon Diselenide
      Carbon Subselenides
      Carbon Oxyselenide
      Carbon Sulphidoselenide
      Cyanogen Monoselenide
      Cyanogen Diselenide or Selenocyanogen
      Cyanogen Triselenide
      Selenocyanic Acid
      Ammonium Selenocyanate
      Caesium Triselenocyanate
      Copper Selenocyanate
      Lead Selenocyanate
      Magnesium Selenocyanate
      Mercurous Selenocyanate
      Mercuric Selenocyanate
      Potassium Selenocyanate
      Silver Selenocyanate
      Sodium Selenocyanate
      Zinc Selenocyanate
      Silicon Selenide
    Detection and Estimation

Carbon Sulphidoselenide, CSSe






Carbon Sulphidoselenide, CSSe, may be prepared by the action of carbon disulphide vapour on ferrous selenide at 650° C. The product, on fractional distillation through a 50-inch bead-filled glass column, yields a deep yellow liquid as residue, which on repeated fractionation through the same column yields a middle fraction of the pure sulphidoselenide. It is obtained as a yellow oil of boiling-point 83.90° to 83.95° C. at 749.2 mm., and having a surface tension γ = 40.44 dynes/cm. at 20° C.

Under the action of zinc and hydrochloric acid the compound suffers reduction to hydrogen sulphide and hydrogen selenide. Chlorine reacts with it to form thiocarbonyl tetrachloride and selenium tetrachloride; bromine acts analogously, except that under certain conditions the compound C2S2SeBr6 may be formed. With ammonia the products of reaction are ill-defined.

Treatment with phenylhydrazine in alcohol solution yields the compound (NHPh.NH2)2CSSe, which appears to be a substituted sulphidoselenocarbamate analogous to the compound formed when phenylhydrazine reacts with carbon disulphide. It is an unstable substance with melting-point 98° C. Aniline yields a somewhat more stable compound (NHPh)4CSSe, with melting-point 164° C. With an alcoholic solution of sodium ethoxide, sodium monoselenoxanthate, NaS.CSe.OEt, is formed. This proves that the sulphidoselenide is analogous to carbon disulphide and carbon diselenide.


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